Sunday, October 20, 2019
  • 1

Select your language / Sélectionnez votre langue

Country specific analyses

This study is the result of research carried out in the framework of the German Development Institute’s Training Programme for young professionals (by Sven Grimm, Kristin Nawrath, Robert Roth, Simon Triebel and Britta Utz)

icon View file (2.39 MB)

This review of the APRM process in Mauritius is one of a series commissioned by AfriMAP, the Africa Governance Monitoring and Advocacy Project of the Open Society Institute’s network of Africa foundations. The report – which was written by and represents the views of Sheila Bunwaree of the University of Mauritius – analyses the extent to which the Mauritius process of self-assessment for the APRM has respected the criteria of effectiveness and credibility defined by the APRM founding documents, in particular the extent to which it has been open, participatory, transparent and accountable. Based on interviews with many of the participants, Bunwaree reviews the challenges faced during the process to date, including a failure on the government side to provide real political leadership and the necessary financial resources, the weaknesses of the National Economic and Social Council as APRM focal point, and a lack of real engagement from civil society. Bunwaree concludes that to be successful, a revived APRM in Mauritius will require ‘a major re-think amongst the key players responsible’ in order to open up the process to broader participation. (by Sheila Bunwaree)
This review is one of a series commissioned by AfriMAP, the Africa Governance Monitoring and Advocacy Project of the Open Society Institute’s network of African foundations. The report – which was written by and represents the views of L. Adele Jinadu, an independent consultant – analyses the extent to which the Nigerian process of self-assessment for the APRM respected the criteria of effectiveness and credibility defi ned by the APRM founding documents, in particular the extent to which it was open, participatory, transparent and accountable. (by Adele Jinadu, AfriMAP)
Mozambique’s implementation of the African Peer Review Mechanism (APRM) process shared many of the strengths experienced by other countries that have undertaken this process of governance assessment. (by Marcelo Mosse and Jonas Fernando Pohlmann)

This report, published by AfriMap, describes the South African APRM process and discusses it's strengths and shortcomings (by Nobuntu Mbele)

icon View file (332.98 kB)

This study was commissioned by the Open Society Institute of Eastern Africa (OSIEA) and the Africa Governance Monitoring and Advocacy Project (AfriMAP) to carry out an assessment and evaluation of the APRM process in Uganda and its outputs. (by Samuel Bamulanzeki Tindifa and Babuuzibwa Mukasa Luutu)

This paper provides an overview of the Ghana country report, citing successes and weaknesses in the four areas the African Peer Review Mechanism.

icon View file (77.98 kB)

This paper was prepared for the 2007 Bergen Seminar: Governance Assessments and the Paris Declaration: Towards Inclusive Participation and National Ownership ( by Dr. Adotey Bing-Pappoe)

icon View file (134.53 kB)

The Rwandan peer review report submitted in June 2005 showed the progress and shortcomings in economic governance.

icon View file (67.96 kB)

This investigates why nothing was done in order to implement the APRM report's recommendations with regard to the problems it has identified during the country review of Kenya (2008) (by Bronwen Manby)

iconView file (103.4 kB)

Page 2 of 2